Free Shipping Over $199

IMPROVE YOUR WOODWORKING PROJECTS WITH A JOINTER!

December 14, 2020

IMPROVE YOUR WOODWORKING PROJECTS WITH A JOINTER!

 

On the last one, we spoke about electric thickness planers. We covered its purpose in the workshop and we took a closer look at the mechanics. If you have not read it yet, CLICK HERE! So why are we talking about it again? Like an impact driver to a drill driver, a jointer makes a great companion to a planer. What one lacks the other compensates, but what exactly is a jointer and how do they work? What are the differences between the two? What is a good jointer to start off with? I am here to help you out and answer these questions!

 

WHATS A JOINTER?

Just like the planer, a jointer essentially has one job, and that is to make lumber perfectly flat and squared off. Eliminating any types of wood warping throughout the entire board. The most common warps you will encounter are twists, cups, and bows (as shown on the diagram below). A jointer will correct these imperfections and provide a better building process. Ultimately, giving you a refined product at the end of your project.

3 Common types of wood warping: Twisting, Cupping, and Bowing.

 

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Like a planer, jointers work around three main components. They are labeled as the In-feed table, Cutter head, and lastly the Out-feed table. This is also the order of how they operate.

 

These tables are adjustable in height, allowing the operator to dial in the exact desired measurement. Once the machine is on, the user will rest the lumber on the in-feed table. Next, the user will safely guide the lumber, using push blocks, straight into the cutter head while applying a slight downward pressure along the way. At this point, the cutter head will shave off material from underneath the wooden board. Lastly, the out-feed table will catch and support the freshly milled board as you finish off the pass.

 

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN A PLANER AND JOINTER?

This is a great question! Both of these units are preparation power tools, or to be a little bit more specific, milling machines. Which means they are used at the beginning of a project to assist you in obtaining flat and even lumber. Making it much easier to handle during the rest of the building project. The difference between the two is simple. A planer is used to make a wooden board a consistent and specific thickness. A jointer is used to make a wooden board evenly flat on all sides. Both machines are able to accomplish its task throughout the entire length of the board.

 

Now that you have a better understanding on how they operate and distinguishing the differences, you’re probably interested in knowing what jointer is a good first purchase. A great place to start is the Porter-Cable PC160JT 6” Jointer!

 

Buy Jointer Now

 

FEATURES

    • Variable speed range of 6,000 to 11,000 RPM allows the user to select the right speed for the size and hardness of material being cut
    • Two-knife cutter head with jackscrew knife leveling arrangement allows for easy replacement and adjustment of knives
    • 75-in L x 4.25-in W center-mounted fence provides support throughout cut for accurate edge jointing
    • Built-in cutter head lock facilitates knife replacement and adjustment
    • Extra-large table provides ample work support and surfacing stock up to a full 6-in wide
    • Center-mounted fence gives needed support throughout the cut for accurate edge jointing
    • Ideal for edging, flattening, and face jointing
    • Independently certified to applicable standards

 

SPECIFICATIONS

    • AMPS - 10.0
    • MAX DEPTH OF CUT - 0.125 IN
    • JOINTER TYPE - BENCH
    • TOOL WEIGHT - 35 LBS
    • RABBETING DEPTH - 0.0625 IN
    • MAX RPM - 11,000 RPM
    • POWER TOOL TYPE - CORDED
    • BLADE LENGTH - 6 IN

Shop All Jointers

 

I hope you found this read helpful. The goal is to expand your knowledge and to familiarize yourself on these two woodworking machines. Knowing what these machines are capable of, understanding how they work, and acknowledging how they can help during a build is half the battle. Knowing how to operate them and forming good techniques is key but will come naturally with practice and patience. Always remember to wear hearing and eye protection when using any powered machinery. Stay safe everybody!!!